Reading Lists Online

The Library collaborates with academic staff to ensure that resources for students, both in print and online, are in the right place, at the right time, and in the right format. An important part of this process is the sharing of reading lists.

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Reading lists and Blackboard

The University’s template for all Blackboard modules includes a Reading List button to provide a 'one-stop shop’ for finding resources referred to within modules. The ultimate aim is to enhance the student experience by providing seamless access to online resources such as eBooks, online newspapers and journals (or specific articles), scanned book chapters, websites, media as well as 'live’ links to the Library Catalogue for books, CDs, DVDs and other physical materials.

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How are reading lists online evolving?

The University has invested in reading list software, Talis Aspire – a flexible system which better meets the demands of today’s students. All reading lists online are created and maintained in this enhanced format.

Benefits for academic staff include:

  • easily create and manage reading lists.
  • personalise lists to suit your module structure.
  • order books and request digitization of key chapters or articles.
  • lead the selection and purchase of Library material.
  • integrate lists into your Blackboard modules.
  • harvest items for your reading list while browsing the Web, including books from the library catalogue, Amazon, web pages, YouTube videos and more.
  • comply with copyright legislation.

Benefits for students include:

  • up-to-date module reading.
  • click through to full text e-resources straight from the list.
  • integration into Blackboard, the library catalogue and FINDit.
  • guidance notes from lecturers.
  • improved study experience.
  • consistent approach across all modules studied.
  • personalise reading lists.

From a library perspective, it provides more effective tools for compilation, maintenance, review and assists the acquisitions process.

This is an example of how a reading list appears. A student can access their reading list in the appropriate Blackboard
module, by clicking the Reading List button.

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How can we help you to create and maintain your list?

The Digital Resources Librarian, Rachael Johnson, coordinates the creation of online reading lists and Blackboard module links to it. Our software however, offers tools that enables academics to create and manage their own reading lists online.

To discuss online reading lists for your module, please liaise with your Information Librarian. Library staff can assist you with the creation of reading lists or create them on your behalf.

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Guide to creating reading lists

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We all need to consider copyright issues when publishing information online. The basic rule of thumb when developing online materials is to utilise copyright ‘free’ or Creative Commons content as much as possible. Looking at the Terms of Use of specific content online will clarify.

Using any substantial extract from a book, journal, webpage etc. will usually need express permission from the owner/publisher.
For further guidance and advice on any copyright matter please see the Copyright & Intellectual Property page.

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Other library guides and support

Our Information for Academic Staff pages include a section about other ways in which the library can provide support for your teaching.

We also have a selection of guides to using the Library’s resources